#724 – 1932 3c William Penn

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.30
$1.30
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.30
$0.30
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.80FREE with 180 points!
$0.80
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.20
$0.20
10 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM50350 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 27 x 30 millimeters (1 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
$2.95
- MM4200Mystic Clear Mount 27x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
U.S. #724
1932 3¢ William Penn

Issue Date:
October 24, 1932
First City: New Castle, DE, Chester and Philadelphia, PA
Quantity Issued: 49,949,000
 
U.S. #724 was issued to commemorate Pennsylvania’s 250th anniversary. The stamp pictures William Penn, the founder of the “Keystone State.”
 
William Penn Founds Pennsylvania
William Penn (1644-1718) was born in London, England, the son of a prominent naval officer who was later knighted Admiral Sir William Penn. Penn became a member of a religious group whose members were known as “Quakers.” In England at that time, Quakers were persecuted for their beliefs.
 
In 1681, King Charles II granted the region that is now Pennsylvania to Penn to repay a debt to his father. Penn decided to call the region Sylvania, which means woods. King Charles II added Penn to the name in honor of Admiral Penn. Penn wanted Quakers, as well as members of other faiths, to enjoy religious freedom in Pennsylvania. In 1682, Penn arrived in the colony and enacted its first constitution, called the “Frame of Government.”
 
Pennsylvania prospered under Penn’s leadership. Penn died in 1718, and the colony remained under the control of the Penn family until it became a state on December 12, 1787. Pennsylvania was the second state to join the Union.

Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

U.S. #724
1932 3¢ William Penn

Issue Date:
October 24, 1932
First City: New Castle, DE, Chester and Philadelphia, PA
Quantity Issued: 49,949,000
 
U.S. #724 was issued to commemorate Pennsylvania’s 250th anniversary. The stamp pictures William Penn, the founder of the “Keystone State.”
 
William Penn Founds Pennsylvania
William Penn (1644-1718) was born in London, England, the son of a prominent naval officer who was later knighted Admiral Sir William Penn. Penn became a member of a religious group whose members were known as “Quakers.” In England at that time, Quakers were persecuted for their beliefs.
 
In 1681, King Charles II granted the region that is now Pennsylvania to Penn to repay a debt to his father. Penn decided to call the region Sylvania, which means woods. King Charles II added Penn to the name in honor of Admiral Penn. Penn wanted Quakers, as well as members of other faiths, to enjoy religious freedom in Pennsylvania. In 1682, Penn arrived in the colony and enacted its first constitution, called the “Frame of Government.”
 
Pennsylvania prospered under Penn’s leadership. Penn died in 1718, and the colony remained under the control of the Penn family until it became a state on December 12, 1787. Pennsylvania was the second state to join the Union.