#725 – 1932 3c Daniel Webster

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U.S. #725
1932 3¢ Webster Sesquicentennial

Issue Date:
October 24, 1932
First City: Franklin, Exeter, and Hanover, NH
Quantity Issued: 49,538,500
The state of New Hampshire commemorated the 150th anniversary of Daniel Webster’s birth in 1932, and requests were made to have a stamp issued in conjunction with the celebration. 
 
While Webster has faded into history somewhat today, he was held in very high regard at the time. Webster’s first appearance on a U.S. postage stamp was in 1870 on the 15¢ series produced by the National Bank Note Company (U.S. #141). U.S. #725 is the fifth U.S. stamp issued picturing Webster’s likeness. 
 
The next stamp featuring Webster was issued in 1969 to commemorate the decision in the Dartmouth College Case, a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision dealing with the government’s right to apply the Contract Clause to private corporations. The case settled the nature of public versus private charters, resulting in the rise of American business corporations.
 
Daniel Webster (1782-1852)
Statesman
Daniel Webster was born in Salisbury (now Franklin), New Hampshire. He attended Dartmouth College and studied law in Boston. Webster became one of the most important lawyers of his time. He is well remembered for his arguments before the Supreme Court in the case of Dartmouth College v. Woodward. 
 
Webster served New Hampshire as a United States Congressman and Senator. In Congress, he further enhanced his reputation as one of the nation’s greatest orators. He served as Secretary of State under three presidents – William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.
 
Webster gained his greatest fame as a supporter of a strong national government. His words, such as “Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!” served as inspiration to Union soldiers during the American Civil War.
 
A statue of Daniel Webster represents the state of New Hampshire in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol.
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U.S. #725
1932 3¢ Webster Sesquicentennial

Issue Date:
October 24, 1932
First City: Franklin, Exeter, and Hanover, NH
Quantity Issued: 49,538,500
The state of New Hampshire commemorated the 150th anniversary of Daniel Webster’s birth in 1932, and requests were made to have a stamp issued in conjunction with the celebration. 
 
While Webster has faded into history somewhat today, he was held in very high regard at the time. Webster’s first appearance on a U.S. postage stamp was in 1870 on the 15¢ series produced by the National Bank Note Company (U.S. #141). U.S. #725 is the fifth U.S. stamp issued picturing Webster’s likeness. 
 
The next stamp featuring Webster was issued in 1969 to commemorate the decision in the Dartmouth College Case, a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision dealing with the government’s right to apply the Contract Clause to private corporations. The case settled the nature of public versus private charters, resulting in the rise of American business corporations.
 
Daniel Webster (1782-1852)
Statesman
Daniel Webster was born in Salisbury (now Franklin), New Hampshire. He attended Dartmouth College and studied law in Boston. Webster became one of the most important lawyers of his time. He is well remembered for his arguments before the Supreme Court in the case of Dartmouth College v. Woodward. 
 
Webster served New Hampshire as a United States Congressman and Senator. In Congress, he further enhanced his reputation as one of the nation’s greatest orators. He served as Secretary of State under three presidents – William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, and Millard Fillmore.
 
Webster gained his greatest fame as a supporter of a strong national government. His words, such as “Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!” served as inspiration to Union soldiers during the American Civil War.
 
A statue of Daniel Webster represents the state of New Hampshire in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol.