#853 – 1939 3c New York World's Fair

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U.S. #853
1939 3¢ Trylon and Perisphere

Issue Date: April 1, 1939
First City: New York, New York
Quantity Issued: 101,699,550
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 ½ x 11
Color: Deep Purple
 
The New York World’s Fair, featured on U.S. #853, was the largest world’s fair ever. The stamp showcases the “Trylon” and “Perisphere,” two of the most famous images of the Fair. Over 44 million people attended the fair.
 
The Trylon was a 700-foot-tall spire that was connected to the Perisphere – a sphere with a diameter of 180 feet. Their images were issued on U.S. #853 on April 1, 1939, but were open to the public later that month at the Grand Opening held on April 30. The Perisphere housed a “world of tomorrow” model city that could be viewed by visitors on a moving walkway.
 
FDR – A President’s Stamp Collection
 U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was an avid stamp collector. While President, he took a very active hand in the development and design of U.S. stamps. He proposed themes, suggested colors and designs, and even made sketches for new stamps. Roosevelt had a hand in about 200 new stamps. On the morning of the day he died (April 12, 1945), Roosevelt approved the design for “Towards United Nations” (U.S. #928).
 
After his death, Roosevelt’s personal collection was offered in four auctions in New York City in 1946. While President, he had received items such as U.S. essays and die proofs of 20th century stamps. This raised a controversy, as some philatelists argued that such items actually belonged to the U.S. government. Still, many people wanted to own an “FDR stamp” and even common, modern stamps from his collection brought high prices far beyond normal value. 
 
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U.S. #853
1939 3¢ Trylon and Perisphere

Issue Date: April 1, 1939
First City: New York, New York
Quantity Issued: 101,699,550
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 ½ x 11
Color: Deep Purple
 
The New York World’s Fair, featured on U.S. #853, was the largest world’s fair ever. The stamp showcases the “Trylon” and “Perisphere,” two of the most famous images of the Fair. Over 44 million people attended the fair.
 
The Trylon was a 700-foot-tall spire that was connected to the Perisphere – a sphere with a diameter of 180 feet. Their images were issued on U.S. #853 on April 1, 1939, but were open to the public later that month at the Grand Opening held on April 30. The Perisphere housed a “world of tomorrow” model city that could be viewed by visitors on a moving walkway.
 
FDR – A President’s Stamp Collection
 U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was an avid stamp collector. While President, he took a very active hand in the development and design of U.S. stamps. He proposed themes, suggested colors and designs, and even made sketches for new stamps. Roosevelt had a hand in about 200 new stamps. On the morning of the day he died (April 12, 1945), Roosevelt approved the design for “Towards United Nations” (U.S. #928).
 
After his death, Roosevelt’s personal collection was offered in four auctions in New York City in 1946. While President, he had received items such as U.S. essays and die proofs of 20th century stamps. This raised a controversy, as some philatelists argued that such items actually belonged to the U.S. government. Still, many people wanted to own an “FDR stamp” and even common, modern stamps from his collection brought high prices far beyond normal value.