#UN1-11 – 1951 N.Y. U.N. Headquarters, Fla

Condition
Price
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- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$19.50
$19.50
United Nations stamps were first issued in 1951.  All U.N. stamp issues are linked to the responsibilities, challenges, and achievements of the United Nations, which are international in scope.  U.N. stamps are unique in that they are the only stamps valid for postage which are not issued by a sovereign nation. The stamps pay postage when mailed at U.N. Headquarters in New York City. The U.N. Headquarters in New York, and the flag which features the U.N. logo - a map of the world surrounded by a wreath of olive branches symbolizing peace - are subjects pictured on the 1951 U.N. stamps.  Other goals of the U.N. represented on stamps are world unity with peace, justice, and security for all people of the earth. The UNICEF stamp shown symbolizes the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund which was established in 1946 to provide food, clothing, and medical supplies for child victims of World War II.  This emergency ended in the early 1950s, but UNICEF had become so popular that the General Assembly made it a permanent organization in 1953.  Today, UNICEF aids in child development and care, job training, and family planning world-wide.  Most of the funds come from voluntary contributions.  The U.S. committee raises most of its money from the Halloween trick or treat collectors and from the sale of greeting cards.  In 1965, UNICEF received the Nobel Peace Prize for its work in helping children.
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United Nations stamps were first issued in 1951.  All U.N. stamp issues are linked to the responsibilities, challenges, and achievements of the United Nations, which are international in scope.  U.N. stamps are unique in that they are the only stamps valid for postage which are not issued by a sovereign nation. The stamps pay postage when mailed at U.N. Headquarters in New York City.

The U.N. Headquarters in New York, and the flag which features the U.N. logo - a map of the world surrounded by a wreath of olive branches symbolizing peace - are subjects pictured on the 1951 U.N. stamps.  Other goals of the U.N. represented on stamps are world unity with peace, justice, and security for all people of the earth.

The UNICEF stamp shown symbolizes the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund which was established in 1946 to provide food, clothing, and medical supplies for child victims of World War II.  This emergency ended in the early 1950s, but UNICEF had become so popular that the General Assembly made it a permanent organization in 1953.  Today, UNICEF aids in child development and care, job training, and family planning world-wide.  Most of the funds come from voluntary contributions.  The U.S. committee raises most of its money from the Halloween trick or treat collectors and from the sale of greeting cards.  In 1965, UNICEF received the Nobel Peace Prize for its work in helping children.