#2980 – 1995 32c Women's Suffrage

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U.S. #2980
1995 32¢ Woman’s Suffrage
 
Issue Date: August 26, 1995
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 105,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Although many women today take the right to vote for granted, it was a right that for well over a century American women were denied. In fact, it wasn’t until the early 1800s that various women’s movements gained strength throughout the country. Striving to change women’s roles, these organizations worked to remove the barriers that prevented women from enjoying their full rights. In 1848, the first Women’s Rights Convention was organized in Seneca Falls, New York.
 
Following the Civil War the issue of suffrage became increasingly important. And despite the fact that by the beginning of the 20th century the right to vote had been won in only four states, the suffrage movement continued to gain national momentum. Demanding the right to vote, women across the country held rallies, gave speeches, marched in parades, and lobbied in Congress. When the grand dames of society joined the cause, suffrage even became fashionable.
 
On June 4, 1919, Congress passed the 19th amendment to the Constitution which stated that no citizen should be denied the right to vote “on account of sex.” More than just a victory for women it was, as the Kansas City Star proclaimed, “a victory for democracy and the principle of equality upon which the nation was founded.”
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U.S. #2980
1995 32¢ Woman’s Suffrage
 
Issue Date: August 26, 1995
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 105,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Although many women today take the right to vote for granted, it was a right that for well over a century American women were denied. In fact, it wasn’t until the early 1800s that various women’s movements gained strength throughout the country. Striving to change women’s roles, these organizations worked to remove the barriers that prevented women from enjoying their full rights. In 1848, the first Women’s Rights Convention was organized in Seneca Falls, New York.
 
Following the Civil War the issue of suffrage became increasingly important. And despite the fact that by the beginning of the 20th century the right to vote had been won in only four states, the suffrage movement continued to gain national momentum. Demanding the right to vote, women across the country held rallies, gave speeches, marched in parades, and lobbied in Congress. When the grand dames of society joined the cause, suffrage even became fashionable.
 
On June 4, 1919, Congress passed the 19th amendment to the Constitution which stated that no citizen should be denied the right to vote “on account of sex.” More than just a victory for women it was, as the Kansas City Star proclaimed, “a victory for democracy and the principle of equality upon which the nation was founded.”