#2987 – 1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Charlie Parker

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U.S. #2987
1995 32¢ Charlie “Bird” Parker
Jazz Musician

Issue Date: September 16, 1995
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 15,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Charles Parker Jr. was born in Kansas City, Kansas in 1920. His mother bought him an alto saxophone when he was 11, and he played baritone horn in the school band. When he was only 15 years old, Parker quit school and became a full-time musician. He soon became involved in what would be a great source of tragedy throughout his life: narcotics addiction.
 
Parker developed his inimitable style while wandering in and out of various bands, including those of Jay McShann, Earl Hines, and Billy Eckstine. His incredible playing earned him many nicknames, including Charlie, Yardbird, and Bird. In 1941, while playing with McShann in New York City, he met trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. These two men were among the most prominent of a group of musicians credited with creating the “bebop” or “bop” style.
 
A contemporary of Parker once said, “If Charlie wanted to invoke plagiarism laws, he could sue almost anyone who’s made a record in the last ten years.” A true musical genius, Parker’s mastery of the saxophone, improvisational skill, and compositions elevated the status quo for all aspects of jazz music. His best known works include “Now’s The Time,” “Yardbird Suite,” “Confirmation,” and “Relaxin’ At Camarillo.”
 

Birth of Miles Davis

2012 Miles Davis stamp
US #4693 – 2012 Miles Davis stamp

Musician Miles Dewey Davis III was born on May 26, 1926, in Alton, Illinois.  By continually reinventing his technique, Davis became one of the most influential jazz musicians of all time.  In a career spanning 50 years, he left his fingerprint on every major development in jazz since the 1940s.

2011 Jazz stamp
US #4503 – Davis was one of the most influential jazz musicians of all time.

Davis enjoyed music from an early age, drawn to blues, big bands, and gospel.  He got his first trumpet in 1935 and took lessons from Elwood Buchanan, a patient from his father’s dentist office.  By the time he was 12, Davis said music was the most important thing in his life.  He started playing in local bands and joined his high school’s marching band.  Davis also became intensely interested in music theory, searching for any books he could find on the subject.

1995 Charlie Parker stamp
US #2987 – Davis performed with Parker’s bebop quintet from 1944-48.

Davis joined the Rhumboogie Orchestra (also known as the Blue Devils) to fill a vacant seat.  While still in high school, he became the group’s musical director and later stated that this had been one of the most important jobs of his career.  In 1944, Davis joined Billy Eckstine, Art Blakey, Dizzy Gillespie, and Charlie Parker in a two-week stint at Club Riviera.  The experience convinced him that he should go to New York City “where the action was.”

1995 Thelonius Monk stamp
US #2990 – Davis performed with Monk in the 1940s.

Davis went to New York in 1944 and attended the Institute of Music Arts (later known as the Juilliard School of Music), where he studied music theory, piano, and dictation.  However, he frequently skipped classes, searching the clubs for his idol, Charlie Parker.  Once he found Parker, he was invited to become a regular at popular Harlem clubs.  There, he participated in nightly jam sessions that sometimes included J.J. Johnson, Kenny Clarke, Thelonius Monk, Fats Navarro, and Freddie Webster.

1995 Charles Mingus stamp
US #2989 – Davis performed with Mingus in the 1940s and 50s.

Davis dropped out of school after three semesters to focus on performing full-time.  He found his niche playing jam sessions in Harlem nightclubs.  Adding a relaxed, melodic approach to bebop, Davis introduced the “cool jazz” movement with his 1957 album, Birth of the Cool.

1995 John Coltrane stamp
US #2991 – Coltrane was part of Davis’s band in the 1950s.
2014 International Year of Jazz NY sheet
United Nations #UN1087 – New York Office International Year of Jazz stamp

Davis’s “Hard Bop” period coincided with a tour in Paris, where he enjoyed more respect than black musicians experienced in the US.  In 1959, his Kind of Blue was recorded.  The album became the best-selling jazz record of all time and was proclaimed a national treasure by the US House of Representatives.  Davis experimented with electric instruments, jazz fusion, and funk until the 70s, when he began to suffer health issues so severe that Rolling Stone magazine reported he was on his deathbed.

2014 International Year of Jazz Geneva sheet
United Nations #UNG579 – Geneva Office International Year of Jazz stamp

Davis rallied, rekindled his romance with actress Cicely Tyson, and conquered a drug addiction.  Released in 1986, his album Tutu won a Grammy, which was followed by a Lifetime Achievement Award in 1990.  This was the most commercially successful period of his career, with sold-out concerts around the world and projects in the visual arts, film, and television.  Davis suffered a stroke and died on September 28, 1991.  He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006 as “one of the key figures in the history of Jazz.”  He’s also been called “the most revered jazz trumpeter of all time” and “inarguably one of the most influential and innovative musicians” of the 20th century.

 
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U.S. #2987
1995 32¢ Charlie “Bird” Parker
Jazz Musician

Issue Date: September 16, 1995
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 15,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Charles Parker Jr. was born in Kansas City, Kansas in 1920. His mother bought him an alto saxophone when he was 11, and he played baritone horn in the school band. When he was only 15 years old, Parker quit school and became a full-time musician. He soon became involved in what would be a great source of tragedy throughout his life: narcotics addiction.
 
Parker developed his inimitable style while wandering in and out of various bands, including those of Jay McShann, Earl Hines, and Billy Eckstine. His incredible playing earned him many nicknames, including Charlie, Yardbird, and Bird. In 1941, while playing with McShann in New York City, he met trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. These two men were among the most prominent of a group of musicians credited with creating the “bebop” or “bop” style.
 
A contemporary of Parker once said, “If Charlie wanted to invoke plagiarism laws, he could sue almost anyone who’s made a record in the last ten years.” A true musical genius, Parker’s mastery of the saxophone, improvisational skill, and compositions elevated the status quo for all aspects of jazz music. His best known works include “Now’s The Time,” “Yardbird Suite,” “Confirmation,” and “Relaxin’ At Camarillo.”
 

Birth of Miles Davis

2012 Miles Davis stamp
US #4693 – 2012 Miles Davis stamp

Musician Miles Dewey Davis III was born on May 26, 1926, in Alton, Illinois.  By continually reinventing his technique, Davis became one of the most influential jazz musicians of all time.  In a career spanning 50 years, he left his fingerprint on every major development in jazz since the 1940s.

2011 Jazz stamp
US #4503 – Davis was one of the most influential jazz musicians of all time.

Davis enjoyed music from an early age, drawn to blues, big bands, and gospel.  He got his first trumpet in 1935 and took lessons from Elwood Buchanan, a patient from his father’s dentist office.  By the time he was 12, Davis said music was the most important thing in his life.  He started playing in local bands and joined his high school’s marching band.  Davis also became intensely interested in music theory, searching for any books he could find on the subject.

1995 Charlie Parker stamp
US #2987 – Davis performed with Parker’s bebop quintet from 1944-48.

Davis joined the Rhumboogie Orchestra (also known as the Blue Devils) to fill a vacant seat.  While still in high school, he became the group’s musical director and later stated that this had been one of the most important jobs of his career.  In 1944, Davis joined Billy Eckstine, Art Blakey, Dizzy Gillespie, and Charlie Parker in a two-week stint at Club Riviera.  The experience convinced him that he should go to New York City “where the action was.”

1995 Thelonius Monk stamp
US #2990 – Davis performed with Monk in the 1940s.

Davis went to New York in 1944 and attended the Institute of Music Arts (later known as the Juilliard School of Music), where he studied music theory, piano, and dictation.  However, he frequently skipped classes, searching the clubs for his idol, Charlie Parker.  Once he found Parker, he was invited to become a regular at popular Harlem clubs.  There, he participated in nightly jam sessions that sometimes included J.J. Johnson, Kenny Clarke, Thelonius Monk, Fats Navarro, and Freddie Webster.

1995 Charles Mingus stamp
US #2989 – Davis performed with Mingus in the 1940s and 50s.

Davis dropped out of school after three semesters to focus on performing full-time.  He found his niche playing jam sessions in Harlem nightclubs.  Adding a relaxed, melodic approach to bebop, Davis introduced the “cool jazz” movement with his 1957 album, Birth of the Cool.

1995 John Coltrane stamp
US #2991 – Coltrane was part of Davis’s band in the 1950s.
2014 International Year of Jazz NY sheet
United Nations #UN1087 – New York Office International Year of Jazz stamp

Davis’s “Hard Bop” period coincided with a tour in Paris, where he enjoyed more respect than black musicians experienced in the US.  In 1959, his Kind of Blue was recorded.  The album became the best-selling jazz record of all time and was proclaimed a national treasure by the US House of Representatives.  Davis experimented with electric instruments, jazz fusion, and funk until the 70s, when he began to suffer health issues so severe that Rolling Stone magazine reported he was on his deathbed.

2014 International Year of Jazz Geneva sheet
United Nations #UNG579 – Geneva Office International Year of Jazz stamp

Davis rallied, rekindled his romance with actress Cicely Tyson, and conquered a drug addiction.  Released in 1986, his album Tutu won a Grammy, which was followed by a Lifetime Achievement Award in 1990.  This was the most commercially successful period of his career, with sold-out concerts around the world and projects in the visual arts, film, and television.  Davis suffered a stroke and died on September 28, 1991.  He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006 as “one of the key figures in the history of Jazz.”  He’s also been called “the most revered jazz trumpeter of all time” and “inarguably one of the most influential and innovative musicians” of the 20th century.