#3024 – 1996 32c Utah Statehood

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U.S. #3024
1995 32¢ Utah Statehood

Issue Date: January 4, 1996
City: Salt Lake City, UT
Quantity: 120,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
The first stamp of the 1996 year was issued to commemorate the centennial celebration of Utah's statehood. Utah was first settled by the Mormons in 1847. On January 4, 1896, it was admitted to the Union as our 45th state. The stamp's contemporary design depicts Delicate Arch, one of Utah's most famous landmarks.
 
Utah
The state of Utah was named after the Ute Indians, one of the Native American groups who first inhabited the region. In 1776, two Franciscan friars became the first Europeans to explore this area. Fleeing the religious persecution they had found in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, the Mormons, led by Brigham Young, settled near the Great Salt Lake in 1847.
 
The Mormons established the State of Deseret, which became a U.S. territory in 1850. Between 1849 and 1895, Utah requested statehood several times, but was denied due to the Mormon practice of polygamy (a man having more than one wife). In 1895 Utah submitted a new state constitution to the U.S. Congress, which included a provision giving women the right to vote. On January 4, 1896, Utah became our 45th state.
 
Today two thirds of Utah’s citizens are Mormon. Among the many unique attractions located in their state are: the world famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir; the Mormon Temple, which took 40 years to construct; Brigham Young University; the Golden Spike National Historic Site, which commemorates the completion of the country’s first transcontinental railroad; and Delicate Arch, the geological formation featured on this stamp and cover, as well as Utah’s license plates.
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U.S. #3024
1995 32¢ Utah Statehood

Issue Date: January 4, 1996
City: Salt Lake City, UT
Quantity: 120,000,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommers for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
The first stamp of the 1996 year was issued to commemorate the centennial celebration of Utah's statehood. Utah was first settled by the Mormons in 1847. On January 4, 1896, it was admitted to the Union as our 45th state. The stamp's contemporary design depicts Delicate Arch, one of Utah's most famous landmarks.
 
Utah
The state of Utah was named after the Ute Indians, one of the Native American groups who first inhabited the region. In 1776, two Franciscan friars became the first Europeans to explore this area. Fleeing the religious persecution they had found in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, the Mormons, led by Brigham Young, settled near the Great Salt Lake in 1847.
 
The Mormons established the State of Deseret, which became a U.S. territory in 1850. Between 1849 and 1895, Utah requested statehood several times, but was denied due to the Mormon practice of polygamy (a man having more than one wife). In 1895 Utah submitted a new state constitution to the U.S. Congress, which included a provision giving women the right to vote. On January 4, 1896, Utah became our 45th state.
 
Today two thirds of Utah’s citizens are Mormon. Among the many unique attractions located in their state are: the world famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir; the Mormon Temple, which took 40 years to construct; Brigham Young University; the Golden Spike National Historic Site, which commemorates the completion of the country’s first transcontinental railroad; and Delicate Arch, the geological formation featured on this stamp and cover, as well as Utah’s license plates.