#3286 – 1999 33c Irish Immigration

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.30FREE with 270 points!
$1.30
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM67145x32mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.25
$4.25
U.S. #3286
33¢ Irish Immigration
 
Issue Date: February 26, 1999
City: Boston, MA
Quantity: 40,400,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Multicolored
 
Religious persecution, extreme poverty, crop failures, and overcrowding forced nearly 3.5 million Irish people to abandon their homeland and seek prosperity in the United States between 1820 and 1880. Ireland’s poor peasant class suffered the greatest hardships.
 
In 1660, less than one million people lived in Ireland. By 1840, the population had jumped to eight million. This had a large effect on landless Irish, who toiled desperately on patches of ground rented from absentee land owners. To accommodate the increase in people, land holdings were divided into smaller parcels. Most farmers weren’t able to produce enough food from these two- or three-acre plots to feed their families. Then disaster struck. The potato famine of 1845 pushed families who depended on milk and potatoes to starvation. As a result, many abandoned their homeland.
 
Irish immigration peaked during the 1840s, when two million people arrived on America’s shores. Most settled in the cities where they landed: mainly New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Soon, the Irish were establishing churches and building communities. Also, Irish laborers became the mainstay of construction crews who built the canal and railroad systems of this country.
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Winter Scenes

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing winter scenes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $8.50- $64.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1980s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1980s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers honored the 1980 Winter Olympics, paid tribute to the service of American veterans,  and recalled some of the United States’ most well-known first ladies (like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt).  There was even a cover issued for the World Stamp Expo of 1989.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • U.S. Used Stamp Collection - 157 stamps U.S. Used Collection of 157 stamps

    You'll receive postally used stamps issued from 1890 to 2010 – that's 120 years of history to explore!  This collection includes definitive, commemorative, and Airmail stamps, plus a few other surprises.  You'll have a great time exploring the stamps and adding them to your collection.  Order today.

    $4.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3286
33¢ Irish Immigration
 
Issue Date: February 26, 1999
City: Boston, MA
Quantity: 40,400,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method: Lithographed
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Multicolored
 
Religious persecution, extreme poverty, crop failures, and overcrowding forced nearly 3.5 million Irish people to abandon their homeland and seek prosperity in the United States between 1820 and 1880. Ireland’s poor peasant class suffered the greatest hardships.
 
In 1660, less than one million people lived in Ireland. By 1840, the population had jumped to eight million. This had a large effect on landless Irish, who toiled desperately on patches of ground rented from absentee land owners. To accommodate the increase in people, land holdings were divided into smaller parcels. Most farmers weren’t able to produce enough food from these two- or three-acre plots to feed their families. Then disaster struck. The potato famine of 1845 pushed families who depended on milk and potatoes to starvation. As a result, many abandoned their homeland.
 
Irish immigration peaked during the 1840s, when two million people arrived on America’s shores. Most settled in the cities where they landed: mainly New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. Soon, the Irish were establishing churches and building communities. Also, Irish laborers became the mainstay of construction crews who built the canal and railroad systems of this country.