#4227 – 2008 41c American Scientists: John Bardeen

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.65
$1.65
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 30 days. i$1.25
$1.25
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM62147x32mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$4.75
$4.75

American Scientists
John Bardeen

Issue Date:  March 6, 2008
City:  New York, NY

John Bardeen (1908-1991) made contributions in science that changed our world.  After earning a Ph.D. in physics and math from Princeton University in 1936, Bardeen accepted a teaching position at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.  He remained there until 1941, when he left to work as principal physicist at the U.S. Naval Ordnance Lab in Washington, D.C. 

While in D.C., Bardeen turned down an invitation to join the distinguished scientists of the Manhattan Project, who were developing the atom bomb.  When World War II ended, Bardeen accepted a research position at Bell Laboratories.  There, along with Walter Brattain and William Shockley, he invented the transistor.  Fifty times smaller than the vacuum tubes it replaced in televisions and radios, the transistor made possible the development of almost every modern electronic device, from telephones to missiles.  The three scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for their work in 1956. 

Bardeen left Bell to teach at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1951.  There, along with Leon Cooper and John Schrieffer, Bardeen developed the BCS theory of superconductivity, which in 1972 earned him a second Nobel Prize in Physics. 

John Bardeen was honored with a 2008 U.S. 41¢ stamp in the second se-tenant block of four of the American Scientists Series.

Read More - Click Here


  • 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - First Moon Landing NEW 2019 Moon Landing Stamps

    Commemorates the 50th anniversary of man’s first footstep on the moon’s surface by Neil Armstrong, Commander of the Apollo 11 mission.  First-ever US stamps to be printed on chrome paper!

    $2.25- $235.00
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Mystery Mix Mystic's Famous Mystery Mix

    Build your collection quickly with this mixture of U.S. stamps, foreign stamps, and stamps on covers.  Hours of fun and excitement guaranteed!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 Giant US Commemorative Collection, Mint, 132 Stamps 2018 US Commemorative Collection

    Get every 2018 US commemorative issued plus several bonus sheets, souvenir sheets, and panes – all at once in mint condition.

    $120.95
    BUY NOW

American Scientists
John Bardeen

Issue Date:  March 6, 2008
City:  New York, NY

John Bardeen (1908-1991) made contributions in science that changed our world.  After earning a Ph.D. in physics and math from Princeton University in 1936, Bardeen accepted a teaching position at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.  He remained there until 1941, when he left to work as principal physicist at the U.S. Naval Ordnance Lab in Washington, D.C. 

While in D.C., Bardeen turned down an invitation to join the distinguished scientists of the Manhattan Project, who were developing the atom bomb.  When World War II ended, Bardeen accepted a research position at Bell Laboratories.  There, along with Walter Brattain and William Shockley, he invented the transistor.  Fifty times smaller than the vacuum tubes it replaced in televisions and radios, the transistor made possible the development of almost every modern electronic device, from telephones to missiles.  The three scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for their work in 1956. 

Bardeen left Bell to teach at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1951.  There, along with Leon Cooper and John Schrieffer, Bardeen developed the BCS theory of superconductivity, which in 1972 earned him a second Nobel Prize in Physics. 

John Bardeen was honored with a 2008 U.S. 41¢ stamp in the second se-tenant block of four of the American Scientists Series.