#557 – 1922 5c Theodore Roosevelt, dark blue

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U.S. #557
Series of 1922-25
5¢ Theodore Roosevelt
 
Issue Date: October 27, 1922
First City: New York, NY, Oyster Bay, NY and Washington D.C.
Issue Quantity: 780,624,677
 
Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919)
North Dakota Cattle Rancher
 
“I never would have been President if it had not
been
for my experiences in North Dakota.”
– Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy Roosevelt is well known for his heroics in the Spanish-American War and his presidency. Part of his zest for life can be traced to his experiences in the last days of America’s wild west.
 
A New Yorker, Theodore Roosevelt first went to North Dakota in 1883, while on a hunting trip. At that time, North Dakota was part of the vast Dakota territory. Roosevelt enjoyed his visit to the badlands and became interested in the cattle business. He invested in the Maltese Cross Ranch and returned the next year to establish the Elkhorn Ranch.
 
As Roosevelt spent more time in the badlands, he became increasingly concerned with how this fragile environment was being damaged. Big game species like bison and bighorn sheep had nearly been decimated. Overgrazing destroyed grasslands and the habitat of small mammals and birds. Roosevelt’s experiences in the badlands made conservation efforts one of his major concerns.
 
The Series of 1922-25
and the Wheels of Progress
In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing. The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.
 
By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press. For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.
 
 
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U.S. #557
Series of 1922-25
5¢ Theodore Roosevelt
 
Issue Date: October 27, 1922
First City: New York, NY, Oyster Bay, NY and Washington D.C.
Issue Quantity: 780,624,677
 
Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919)
North Dakota Cattle Rancher
 
“I never would have been President if it had not
been
for my experiences in North Dakota.”
– Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy Roosevelt is well known for his heroics in the Spanish-American War and his presidency. Part of his zest for life can be traced to his experiences in the last days of America’s wild west.
 
A New Yorker, Theodore Roosevelt first went to North Dakota in 1883, while on a hunting trip. At that time, North Dakota was part of the vast Dakota territory. Roosevelt enjoyed his visit to the badlands and became interested in the cattle business. He invested in the Maltese Cross Ranch and returned the next year to establish the Elkhorn Ranch.
 
As Roosevelt spent more time in the badlands, he became increasingly concerned with how this fragile environment was being damaged. Big game species like bison and bighorn sheep had nearly been decimated. Overgrazing destroyed grasslands and the habitat of small mammals and birds. Roosevelt’s experiences in the badlands made conservation efforts one of his major concerns.
 
The Series of 1922-25
and the Wheels of Progress
In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing. The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.
 
By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press. For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.