#743 – 1934 4c National Parks: Mesa Verde, Colorado

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.60FREE with 350 points!
$1.60
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.65FREE with 140 points!
$0.65
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.00FREE with 220 points!
$1.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.50FREE with 110 points!
$0.50
8 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #743
1934 4¢ Mesa Verde
National Parks Issue

Issue Date:
September 25, 1934
First City: Mesa Verde, CO
Quantity Issued: 19,178,650
 
As a stamp collector, President Franklin D. Roosevelt personally oversaw the selection of stamp subjects and designs during his administration. As Roosevelt was reviewing suggestions for the 1934 schedule, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes saw an opportunity to advertise the national park system. Ickes felt many Americans were unaware the federal government had set aside vast amounts of land for their enjoyment and for future generations. At his suggestion, 1934 had been declared National Parks Year. Ickes now proposed the legacy of the national parks be portrayed on postage stamps to give people a glimpse of their diversity and natural beauty. FDR approved the idea immediately, and ten parks were chosen, each to be pictured on a different denomination ranging from 1¢ to 10¢.
 
Mesa Verde National Park

Native American cliff dwellers built over 600 homes in sandstone canyon walls and under rock overhangs in the southwestern US between 1000 and 1300 A.D.  The dwellings were made from hand-shaped limestone blocks, wooden beams, and mortar.  The Anasazi Indians may have built these cliff dwellings as a defense against northern tribes.

The cliff dwellings of hand-hewn stone building blocks and adobe mortar had few doors on the ground level.  Ladders were used to reach the first roof.  Ceilings were made of logs and branches plastered with adobe, and structures were built several stories high.

The majority of alcoves within Mesa Verde are small with only a few small rooms.  The notable Cliff Palace was 288 feet long and contained 150 rooms and 23 kivas (ceremonial rooms) and had a population of approximately 100 people.  It’s structured much like a modern apartment building. Some sections of Cliff Palace are four stories high.

A great mystery surrounds the cliff dwellings and their builders, who left the area around 1300.  The inhabitants left many articles behind, including pottery, weapons, tools, and other artifacts.  Some believe that the people fled suddenly because of an attack by an enemy band, a natural disaster, or an extreme drought.  Others believe the cliff dwellings were abandoned gradually over a period of more than 100 years.

Trappers and prospectors later discovered the cliffs in the 1800s.  In 1873, prospector John Moss brought a photographer to the canyon.  His photos helped to bring these mysterious dwellings to the public’s attention.  In December 1888, members of the Ute tribe led two cowboys to the Cliff Palace.  One of them, Richard Wetherill, gave the palace its name.  He and his family and friends collected many of the artifacts they found in the cliff dwellings.  One of their guests shipped a large number of items to a museum in Finland, which raised concerns about the protection of the site and its resources.

Virginia McClurg was one of the leading voices in the fight to protect the cliffs, launched a 19-year campaign.  She gained the support of the Federation of Women’s Clubs and enlisted 250,000 women to write letters, publish poems, and give speeches on the cause.  She also founded the Colorado Cliff Dwellers Association.  Her efforts paid off on June 29, 1906, when President Theodore Roosevelt signed the park into law.  It was the first park created to “preserve the works of man.”  The name Mesa Verde is Spanish for “green table” after the forests of juniper and pinion trees.

Over the years, the site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a World Heritage Site.  In 2015, a magazine named it “the best cultural attraction” in the Western United States.  
Read More - Click Here


  • 2019 First-Class Forever Stamp - First Moon Landing NEW 2019 Moon Landing Stamps

    Commemorates the 50th anniversary of man’s first footstep on the moon’s surface by Neil Armstrong, Commander of the Apollo 11 mission.  First-ever US stamps to be printed on chrome paper!

    $2.25- $195.00
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Mystery Mix Mystic's Famous Mystery Mix

    Build your collection quickly with this mixture of U.S. stamps, foreign stamps, and stamps on covers.  Hours of fun and excitement guaranteed!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 Giant US Commemorative Collection, Mint, 132 Stamps 2018 US Commemorative Collection

    Get every 2018 US commemorative issued plus several bonus sheets, souvenir sheets, and panes – all at once in mint condition.

    $120.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #743
1934 4¢ Mesa Verde
National Parks Issue

Issue Date:
September 25, 1934
First City: Mesa Verde, CO
Quantity Issued: 19,178,650
 
As a stamp collector, President Franklin D. Roosevelt personally oversaw the selection of stamp subjects and designs during his administration. As Roosevelt was reviewing suggestions for the 1934 schedule, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes saw an opportunity to advertise the national park system. Ickes felt many Americans were unaware the federal government had set aside vast amounts of land for their enjoyment and for future generations. At his suggestion, 1934 had been declared National Parks Year. Ickes now proposed the legacy of the national parks be portrayed on postage stamps to give people a glimpse of their diversity and natural beauty. FDR approved the idea immediately, and ten parks were chosen, each to be pictured on a different denomination ranging from 1¢ to 10¢.
 
Mesa Verde National Park


Native American cliff dwellers built over 600 homes in sandstone canyon walls and under rock overhangs in the southwestern US between 1000 and 1300 A.D.  The dwellings were made from hand-shaped limestone blocks, wooden beams, and mortar.  The Anasazi Indians may have built these cliff dwellings as a defense against northern tribes.

The cliff dwellings of hand-hewn stone building blocks and adobe mortar had few doors on the ground level.  Ladders were used to reach the first roof.  Ceilings were made of logs and branches plastered with adobe, and structures were built several stories high.

The majority of alcoves within Mesa Verde are small with only a few small rooms.  The notable Cliff Palace was 288 feet long and contained 150 rooms and 23 kivas (ceremonial rooms) and had a population of approximately 100 people.  It’s structured much like a modern apartment building. Some sections of Cliff Palace are four stories high.

A great mystery surrounds the cliff dwellings and their builders, who left the area around 1300.  The inhabitants left many articles behind, including pottery, weapons, tools, and other artifacts.  Some believe that the people fled suddenly because of an attack by an enemy band, a natural disaster, or an extreme drought.  Others believe the cliff dwellings were abandoned gradually over a period of more than 100 years.

Trappers and prospectors later discovered the cliffs in the 1800s.  In 1873, prospector John Moss brought a photographer to the canyon.  His photos helped to bring these mysterious dwellings to the public’s attention.  In December 1888, members of the Ute tribe led two cowboys to the Cliff Palace.  One of them, Richard Wetherill, gave the palace its name.  He and his family and friends collected many of the artifacts they found in the cliff dwellings.  One of their guests shipped a large number of items to a museum in Finland, which raised concerns about the protection of the site and its resources.

Virginia McClurg was one of the leading voices in the fight to protect the cliffs, launched a 19-year campaign.  She gained the support of the Federation of Women’s Clubs and enlisted 250,000 women to write letters, publish poems, and give speeches on the cause.  She also founded the Colorado Cliff Dwellers Association.  Her efforts paid off on June 29, 1906, when President Theodore Roosevelt signed the park into law.  It was the first park created to “preserve the works of man.”  The name Mesa Verde is Spanish for “green table” after the forests of juniper and pinion trees.

Over the years, the site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated a World Heritage Site.  In 2015, a magazine named it “the best cultural attraction” in the Western United States.