#981 – 1949 3c Minnesota Territory

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U.S. #981
1949 3¢ Minnesota Territory Centennial 
 
Issue Date: March 3, 1949
City: St. Paul, Minnesota
Quantity: 99,190,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Blue green
 
Issued in 1949, U.S. #981 pictures a settler with an ox-cart to commemorate the centennial of the founding of the Minnesota Territory. The image highlights the Territory’s rapid expansion. From 1849 to 1857, the population grew from 6,000 to over 150,000, as settlers poured into the region to take advantage of the vast natural resources.
 
Minnesota Territory
And Slave State Compromises
 In 1787, Congress created the Northwest Ordinance to manage all U.S. land between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. After the Louisiana Purchase nearly doubled the size of the U.S., more territorial districts were established. Much of modern Minnesota fell in the Iowa District. As Iowa progressed to statehood in 1846, slavery became a major issue. Iowa’s original state territory included Minnesota lands, but Northern politicians wanted it smaller, to allow for more potential non-slave states. In 1849, the Minnesota territory was made out of portions of the former Iowa and Wisconsin territories.
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U.S. #981
1949 3¢ Minnesota Territory Centennial 
 
Issue Date: March 3, 1949
City: St. Paul, Minnesota
Quantity: 99,190,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Blue green
 
Issued in 1949, U.S. #981 pictures a settler with an ox-cart to commemorate the centennial of the founding of the Minnesota Territory. The image highlights the Territory’s rapid expansion. From 1849 to 1857, the population grew from 6,000 to over 150,000, as settlers poured into the region to take advantage of the vast natural resources.
 
Minnesota Territory
And Slave State Compromises
 In 1787, Congress created the Northwest Ordinance to manage all U.S. land between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. After the Louisiana Purchase nearly doubled the size of the U.S., more territorial districts were established. Much of modern Minnesota fell in the Iowa District. As Iowa progressed to statehood in 1846, slavery became a major issue. Iowa’s original state territory included Minnesota lands, but Northern politicians wanted it smaller, to allow for more potential non-slave states. In 1849, the Minnesota territory was made out of portions of the former Iowa and Wisconsin territories.