#3064 – 1996 32c Pioneers of Communication: William Dickson

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U.S. #3064
32¢ William Dickson
Pioneers of Communication

Issue Date: February 22, 1996
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 23,292,500
Printed By: Ashton-Potter USA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson was born in France in 1860 and moved the United States at the age 19. He began working for Thomas Edison at the Edison Machine Works, a producer of jumbo dynamos (large direct-current generators) on Goerck Street in New York. Later, Dickson became a lab photographer at Edison’s West Orange, New Jersey, laboratory.
 
 
Dickson collaborated with Edison to invent the Kinetoscope, the forerunner of the motion-picture film projector. The Kinetoscope used a 50-foot strip of celluloid film which passed quickly between a lens and a light bulb. To watch, the viewer peered into a peephole. Behind the peephole was a spinning wheel with a small slit that acted as a shutter, permitting a brief glimpse of each frame of film as it passed the viewer’s eye. The result was quite lifelike. Later, Dickson designed and constructed the world’s first movie studio, the “Black Maria,” at the West Orange location.
 
Eventually, Dickson formed his own company, Biograph, and created the Mutoscope. This peephole-style viewer utilized large cardboard photographs flipped by a hand crank; it outperformed the Kinetoscope. In 1892, Dickson and his wife, Antonia, published The Life and Inventions of Thomas Alva Edison.
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U.S. #3064
32¢ William Dickson
Pioneers of Communication

Issue Date: February 22, 1996
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 23,292,500
Printed By: Ashton-Potter USA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson was born in France in 1860 and moved the United States at the age 19. He began working for Thomas Edison at the Edison Machine Works, a producer of jumbo dynamos (large direct-current generators) on Goerck Street in New York. Later, Dickson became a lab photographer at Edison’s West Orange, New Jersey, laboratory.
 
 
Dickson collaborated with Edison to invent the Kinetoscope, the forerunner of the motion-picture film projector. The Kinetoscope used a 50-foot strip of celluloid film which passed quickly between a lens and a light bulb. To watch, the viewer peered into a peephole. Behind the peephole was a spinning wheel with a small slit that acted as a shutter, permitting a brief glimpse of each frame of film as it passed the viewer’s eye. The result was quite lifelike. Later, Dickson designed and constructed the world’s first movie studio, the “Black Maria,” at the West Orange location.
 
Eventually, Dickson formed his own company, Biograph, and created the Mutoscope. This peephole-style viewer utilized large cardboard photographs flipped by a hand crank; it outperformed the Kinetoscope. In 1892, Dickson and his wife, Antonia, published The Life and Inventions of Thomas Alva Edison.